Oliver Richardson

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Mixed Reality – blurring the line between real and virtual

As 2017 picks up pace, the pixies at Team DB are mired in the depths of building, coding and developing some exciting new projects and software for clients this spring and beyond, and there’s one piece of tech which stands out as causing the most excitement and buzz amongst our excitable geeks, and that is Mixed Reality – or MR, the latest upgrade to Virtual Reality.  With the introduction of the Microsoft HoloLens, the team at DBPixelhouse are able to create exciting mixed reality environments that we can drop straight into an event with minimal setup and maximum impact. We think it will be a key trend for event tech this year and we wanted to share our excitement with you.

The rise and rise of VR

Last year, virtual reality was a massive growth area for us, driven by the fact that VR offers an incredibly powerful way to deliver a compelling and immersive experience.  We’ve used VR on a number of recent projects, from creating bespoke content of journeys through the human body to creating virtual venue tours and club-class sneak previews of private jet interiors.  With our own in-house animation team and developers, we can pretty much create any virtual environment, both realistic and fantastical.  But we think mixed reality, which can be combined with gesture control, will help take things to a whole new level.

Taking things to a new level

Mixed reality, or hybrid reality as it’s also called, is a combination of AR, VR and real-world experience where physical and digital objects co-exist and interact. The success of Pokemon Go has really naturalised the interaction between real and virtual worlds, making it acceptable for brands to make their digital worlds a part of and an extension of real-world.   When real and virtual merge in this way, it gives a much clearer opportunity for brands to position themselves as a part of the user’s experience.  Solutions we’ve previously delivered with VR, we can now re-develop to incorporate the live environment within the experience, so for example our aerospace virtual reality cabin tours or virtual jet-engine content can now include live elements that keeps the visitor “with” the brand.  The user is no longer cocooned from the world in a solo journey and so brands can participate and guide the consumer through an experience, rather than being a redundant bystander.  Combined with the use of story-telling, which brands are getting really effective and creative at, this is an exciting development with a wealth of opportunities to wow audiences with stunning content, whilst also educating them and guiding them to ensure key messages are conveyed.  We’re already getting queries for how we can leverage mixed reality in events and experiential and can see some real opportunities for organisers and brands to get really creative, using gamification and mixed reality to increase engagement.

If you’re looking for inspiration or ideas, or want to discuss how your content could be amplified through virtual reality or mixed reality, give our pixies at DBpixelhouse a call today on 0845 226 3083.

  • Brynn Alexander

    Excellent explanation of the differences and similarities among AR, VR, and mixed reality – thanks for sharing!